Long-Haul Adversity Requires Long Faith

Long Faith for the Long Haul

Prior to the coronavirus, the term “long hauler” described the life of a tractor-trailer driver crisscrossing the US with their freight. But in 2020, scientists reintroduced the phrase, “long-haulers” to our vocabulary, referring to people who experience chronic COVID-19 symptoms for months.

Long-haul adversity requires long faith.

Those of us in the chronic warrior community are long-haulers. Whether or not we have experienced COVID-19, we comprehend the emotional, physical, and spiritual haul required each day.

Persistent symptoms snag the hem of the chronically ill. These symptoms differ hour by hour and possess a knack for acting in defiance on special days, rendering sadness and a sense of betrayal of our own body.

Meanwhile, daily weariness weighs down the willing caregiver and extended family. They too struggle with sadness and question what to do. Often the caregiver misses special events too. While they ponder whether to stay behind or attend the function, usually they too stay behind. Sadness and isolation exist for both the chronic illness warrior and the caregiver. Therefore, long-haul adversity requires long faith.

Chronic illness life is akin to walking headlong into a storm. Thankfully, God’s Word gives us a clear depiction of what to do in a storm in Matthew 14: 23-31(NIV):

After he had dismissed them, he went up on a mountainside by himself to pray. Later that night, he was there alone, and the boat was already a considerable distance from land, buffeted by the waves because the wind was against it.

Shortly before dawn, Jesus went out to them, walking on the lake. When the disciples saw him walking on the lake, they were terrified. “It’s a ghost,” they said and cried out in fear.

But Jesus immediately said to them: “Take courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid.”

“Lord, if it’s you,” Peter replied, “tell me to come to you on the water.”

“Come,” he said.

Then Peter got down out of the boat, walked on the water, and came toward Jesus. But when he saw the wind, he was afraid and, beginning to sink, cried out, “Lord, save me!”

Immediately Jesus reached out his hand and caught him. “You of little faith,” he said, “why did you doubt?”

long faith for the long haul

Peter kept walking on the water as long as his eyes remained fixed on Jesus. When Peter allowed the wind to distract him, he began to sink. Pastor, Dr. Dharius Daniels said, “Walking in the wind means I need to have more than strong faith. Walking in the wind means, I need to have long faith.”

As we shuffle headlong through our personal health storm, medical costs, piles of paperwork, and waiting for test results can distract our focus from Jesus. It never fails, if one area of our life is calm, then the wind will blow in another area of our life or our kids, family, or work, tempting us to lose sight of Jesus in the storm.

7 verses for long faith during long haul adversity:

 

“Since, then, you have been raised with Christ, set your hearts on things above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God.” (Colossians 3:1 NIV)

“Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see.” (Hebrews 11:1 NIV)

“In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us through wordless groans.” (Romans 8:26 NIV)

“If God is for us, who can be against us?” (Romans 8:31 NIV)

 “Now to Him who is able to do exceedingly abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that works in us, to Him be glory in the church by Christ Jesus to all generations, forever and ever. Amen.” (Ephesians 3:20-21 NKJV)

 “One thing I ask from the LORD, this only do I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to gaze on the beauty of the LORD and to seek him in his temple.” (Psalm 27:4 NIV)

“Then Jesus said, “Come to me, all of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. 29 Take my yoke upon you. Let me teach you, because I am humble and gentle at heart, and you will find rest for your souls.” (Matthew 11:28-29 NLT)

 

Do you feel like you’re sinking? Hold tight, friend. Keep your eyes on Jesus. If you sink, call out to Him, for He is mighty to save.

Pressing on with you for the long haul.

© April Dawn White 2021

 

long faith for the long haul
long faith for the long haul

👀Back cover sneak peek. 

Destination Hope: A Travel Companion When Life Falls Apart offers camaraderie and a beacon of hope for women who feel alone in loss, struggle, or change of circumstance. This book is not a self-help book filled with platitudes from people who think they have life figured out. Instead, Marilyn Nutter and April White link arms with the audience and encourage their readers through stories of their own hardships in widowhood and chronic illness. Readers are encouraged to see loss and hardship as part of life’s journey and are constantly reminded to turn their gaze upwards, to the Purveyor of Hope. Within the pages of Destination Hope comes a sisterhood, a bond, that can be formed only through the mutual understanding of loss and the need to find hope among hardships

Pre-orders are available now through, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and ChristianBook. Join our book launch team and spread HOPE. (click here to join). 

Borrow Hope from God by Rev. April H. Cranford

Borrow Hope From God

In seasons of doubt, weariness, or fear we can borrow hope from God and our friends to help us persevere through hardship.

I am not a good borrower. There always seems to be an unfortunate set of events when I borrow items that belong to family, friends, or neighbors. I lean toward going without rather than borrowing an item because when I borrow an item, the item breaks before I return it. Whenever I borrow a book, coffee spills onto the cover. Whenever I borrow a sweater, I eat spaghetti and a stain ruins the garment.

Borrow Hope from God

Rev. Kathy Escobar shares in her book A Weary World that we need to borrow hope from God and others to see us through weary seasons of life.

I have used the word ‘borrow’ with tangible items such as borrowing a pencil but not with concepts such as borrowing hope. When we borrow things, there are at least three components:

  • Asking for the item
  • Completing the task
  • Returning the item.

We Were Designed to Depend on One Another

Perhaps, what we really dislike about borrowing is asking for the item. In the asking, we admit we lack something when we rather be seen in the light of having everything together. When we turn to God and others for help, we realize we were designed to depend on one another. Each time we ask and seek, we grow a little wiser and experience love a little deeper.

Perhaps, the difficulty in borrowing is the required follow-up. We may have enough energy in preparing, asking, and completing the task, but putting things back in their place or returning may be too much.

Borrow With Gratitude

The best way to follow up and return a borrowed item is with gratitude.

  • We let a friend know the devotional they sent us started our day off better than we had hoped.
  • We tell a colleague that their words spoken long ago directed us down a clearer path than we had hoped.
  • We write a thank-you card for a family heirloom, which passed down hope through the generations.

Borrow from Scripture

In Matthew, we see hope appear even before a formal request. Joseph borrows hope from an Angel that appears in a dream leading him to take Mary as his wife and to name his son Jesus. 

 “Now the birth of Jesus the Messiah took place in this way…an angel of the Lord appeared to him [Joseph] in a dream and said, “Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary as your wife, for the child conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit. She will bear a son, and you are to name him Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.” All this took place to fulfill what had been spoken by the Lord through the prophet:

 “Look, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son,
    and they shall name him Emmanuel,”

“Which means, “God is with us.” (Matthew 1:18-25 NRSV)

In Seasons of Doubt Borrow Hope

In seasons of doubt, weariness or fear, hope may appear from an angel giving directions in a dream, a friend leaving encouragement on your doorstep, or a memory while listening to a song that motivates you toward persevering in a hardship.

After the angel spoke to Joseph, Matthew includes words from the prophecies of Isaiah that a child would be born to a virgin and named the child Emmanuel – meaning God with Us.

Borrow Hope from God

We believe in a God who is with us. A God, who stands beside us in the hard times and rejoices with us in the good times. We know a God does not abandon us, even when we abandon him. Because of this truth, God knows what we lack. God knows what we need to borrow even before we ask.

Let us borrow hope this week by striving to remain present with a God whose love will never let us go.

Today’s guest writer is Rev. April H. Cranford. Discover her heart to “Match Mission with Joy” on her website, https://www.aprilhcranford.com/.

When Life Hands You Scraps Make a Quilt

When Life Hands You Scraps, Make a Quilt

When Life Hands You Scraps, Make a Quilt.

My friend and I chuckled at this quote hand-painted on a wall in a Chesapeake, VA sewing shop. I love the twist on the cliché, “when life hands you lemons, make lemonade.”

While I like the idea of incorporating fresh lemons in my cooking, rather than the usual lemon concentrate, I often forget to purchase them at the grocery store.

However, as a mother of two and a novice quilter, I always have scraps. Scraps of fabric from previous projects, quilts, or curtains stuffed into bags. Once in a rare whim or craft room organization, I color-coded my scraps into bags.

I quilted this square using the paper-piecing technique. A technique taught to me by my friend Robin. Positioned on a prime piece of real estate in my home, this quilted square serves as my coffee coaster. Every morning, this scrap piece turned quilt square reminds me of our friendship and the decades of struggles we have each faced.

This quilt square sewed from fabric scraps is my visual reminder of the Apostle Paul’s words to the church in Rome: “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.(Romans 8:28)

No matter how unraveled I might feel from unexpected hardship, I know: You hem me in behind and before, and you lay your hand upon me.(Psalm 139:5) and I can never escape God’s presence (Psalm 139:7)

This quilted square is a cheerful reminder that one day; God will use all my scraps to create a beautiful quilted tapestry for His glory.

So, when life hands you scraps, make a quilt. 

~April Dawn White,

© 2016, 2021 April Dawn White, All rights reserved

I’m April Dawn and This is My Month

April Dawn This is my month

Hi! I’m April Dawn and this is my month. There’s always been a bit of fun, joking, and curiosity behind my name. So today, on April Fool’s Day, I thought I’d plunge into some interesting notions surrounding me and my name.

I’m a July (not April) baby!

Contrary to what most people assume, I was not born in April. My birthday falls in the heat of July.

My mother chose two names, one boy and one girl name. Regardless of the month, her daughter would possess the name, “April Dawn.”  If was a boy, my father wanted the name, Shawn Oliver. (Being that my maiden name starts with a ‘B’ that child would have horrible initials.) Thank the Good Lord, I am a girl 🙂

My parents are not hippies.

When my husband’s extended friends and family received our wedding invitations, they  doused him with the same question, “Are April’s parents’ hippies?” To them, the name April Dawn sounded like the name of a free-spirited love child. In reality, my husband’s Irish/Italian family is far more robust and lively than my quiet farm-raised family. The joining of our family resembled the union of the Portokalos and Miller family from “My Big Fat Greek Wedding.” (This is still my favorite all-time movie!)

 

My sister and I were both given the birth name April.

For many years my sister and I differentiated ourselves by the phrase, “Big April and Little April.”

From my toddler years through my teen years, my parents served as foster parents. After much prayer, another April wobbled into our home. My mom kept this little girl in the church nursery and felt prompted to pray for her. Over many weeks, my parents, who had been fostering for years, learned this younger April was entering state custody. Already positioned in the foster care network and known to the child, my parents advocated for her. Little April teetered into our home and our hearts forever. Five years her senior, we used the term “Big April, Little April” until her legal name change.

Meaning of April Dawn 

Latin scholars derived the word April from the noun Aprilis, the fourth month of the year, and from the Latin verb aperire meaning “to open” because leaves and flowered opened in April. [1] The name Dawn offers promise, hope, and light. [2] The inner nerd in my comes alive when I learn about the origins of words and names. Imagine my delight when I discovered my name means to give promise, hope and light.

April Dawn. First and middle name.

Even before my parents adopted my sister, my parents and friends referred to me as April Dawn. To this day, If someone uses my first and middle name, I take it as a cherished throw-back to life in the 70s and 80s.

 

Fast-forward to Adulthood

I began my writing career with the blog titled “Red Chair Moments”. During that time, I signed off each post as “April.” But, as my professional writing career developed, and I received payment as a freelance writer, I added back my middle name. I said goodbye to my first website, Red Chair Moments, and relaunched under my name April Dawn White. Why? I researched and discovered several other writers named April White. Some of these writers do not share the light of hope in Christ I desire to display for my readers.

👉What’s the story behind your name? Please share!

Hugs & Hope,

April Dawn White © 2021

[1] http://wordcentral.com/cgi-bin/student?April

[2] https://www.names.org/n/dawn/about

 

When Your Heart Needs a Friend

Where do you turn when your heart needs a friend? I’m not talking about the gym friend or the book club friend. Instead, a friend who’s walked through hell and still has a hallelujah in their heart.

When your heart needs a friend, you need someone who’s been where you are, fought similar battles, and survived with joy? Do you have such a friend?

I Woke Up in the Land of Oz in Need of a Friend

I know what it’s like to wake up in an unknown place or circumstance. Like, Dorothy, I also woke up in the Land of Oz. One day, in 2015, I woke up totally paralyzed. Sporadic muscle weakness, which occurred for months, one day led to paralysis. What’s happening to me? How long will I be here? An explosion of unknown experiences surrounded me, like Dorothy in a Technicolor™ new and confusing land.  

Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

Thirteen months after experiencing debilitating symptoms, doctors renamed the Land of Oz, Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis. Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis affects one per 100,000 people. [1] It is lonely to possess a rare disease. Daily, I battle emotional isolation. No one around me understands the random paralysis, fluctuating weakness, daily pain, and embarrassing impaired cognitive functioning.

My Heart Needed a Friend

My heart needed a friend who shared the same rare illness. God sent Nancy. Mutual friends introduced us via email and we formed an instant connection. (Only God could arrange mutual friends to know two people with our odd illness.) You could imagine my delight when I discovered she had a meeting near my town. Prior to her return flight, we shared a table at Panera. I sat across the table from someone with my illness. I sought comfort in knowing I wasn’t the only Dorothy in the Land of Oz. For the first time, I knew someone truly understood me.

I peppered her with questions about the illness, her treatment, knowledge of doctors, counseling, etc. But most importantly, her friendship filled me with hope. Hope that I’m not alone on this journey. Hope that I have another person who understands this chronic illness. Better than an aromatherapy (which I use) she infused me with hope through prayer and power in Christ’s name. Nancy’s friendship penetrated my weary heart and helped me renew my faith in God.

God doesn’t call us to fix other people’s problems but to walk with them.

A true friend is someone who will listen without jumping in with a “fix-it” mentality. But rather, someone who is “quick to listen and slow to speak” (James 1:19).

We are relational people, not created to live in isolation. This was on Paul’s mind when he wrote, “that you and I be mutually encouraged by each other’s faith” (Romans 1:12).

You Are Not Alone on this Journey

Friend, whatever battle you are facing, know you are not alone. God sees you and He cares for you. Seek refuge in Him and find comfort in the words penned by David (perhaps when he was in the desert), “You are my hiding place; you will protect me from trouble and surround me with songs of deliverance” (Psalm 32:7).

Singer, songwriter Cody Carnes wrote a beautiful song that captures the essence of this message. I suggest you listen to “Run to the Father” and allow the words and melody to saturate your soul.

If your heart needs a friend, please allow me to be that friend to you. You can reach out to me on my website, subscribe to AprilDawnWhite.com, on Instagram @ aprildawnwhite_author, or on Facebook @AprilDawnWhiteAuthor. Thank you for your patience if I take a few days to respond.

~April Dawn White

© 2016, 2021 April Dawn White, All rights reserved

Photos by Tom Wheatley, Gabor Szuts, & Takahiro Sakamo Unsplash.com

[1] http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1171678-overview#a6

Pile Your Troubles on God’s Shoulders

Learn to Pile Your Troubles on God’s Shoulders.

Burdens lurking at every turn mound quicker than our weary minds can process. These additional burdens are unavoidable and not of our choosing.

“Pile your troubles on God’s shoulders – he’ll carry your load, he’ll help you out. He’ll never let good people topple into ruin.” (Psalm 55:22, MSG)

 

What Trouble is Piling up on You?

It is the bitter wrapped in sweet as your firstborn celebrates a monumental occasion?

Is joy wrapped in burden? Is your family stretching the all-too-thin dollar an inch farther for the <ahem> surprise child?

Perhaps tender compassion is wrapped in heartache as you choose to bring mama to live with you instead of a nursing home. A glance in a mirror and you see a middle-aged woman simultaneously caring for her aging mother and raises teenagers. One striving for independence, the other forced to relinquish independence. You pray for strength each day.

God Invites us to Pile our Troubles on His Shoulders.

Moses understood the stress of a sandstorm of burdens. He led the Israelites away from the oppressive former life of slavery under Pharaoh. The great need surrounding Moses overwhelmed him. His motley crew of refugees, though free, complained constantly.

The escaped Israelites had a front-row seat to the miraculous parting of the Red Sea, yet they had short attention spans of God’s mighty hand. God provided a daily Door Dash delivery in the middle of the desert as manna, but they still complained.

In desperation, Moses cried out to God, “I cannot carry all these people by myself; the burden is too heavy for me.” (Numbers 11:14)

The Lord replied to Moses, “Is the Lord’s arm too short?” (Numbers 11:23)

When burdens pile up, remember the heartfelt plea of Moses and God’s invitation to pile our troubles on His shoulders. God’s arms are not too short to reach, nor His ears too dull to hear.

© 2021 April Dawn White

Images courtesy of Laura Adia and Austin Walker Unsplash

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